Ararat-Eskijian Museum has reopened at 25% capacity. Read our COVID-19 update.

The Museum

The Museum

The Ararat-Eskijian Museum was established in 1985 by Mr. Luther Eskijian, a survivor of the Armenian Genocide of 1915.  This historic landmark is part of the Ararat Home of Los Angeles. His vision was to create an Armenian museum telling the Armenian story  through artifacts, art, maps, books, coins, and other heirlooms. He began with his own private collection, opening the door for others to donate as well. Mr. Eskijian raised the funds for the construction of the church and the Museum, supervised the project even into his late 70’s, and was involved in much of the growth of the Museum for many years.
The Ararat-Eskijian Museum was established in 1985 by Mr. Luther Eskijian, a survivor of the Armenian Genocide of 1915.  This historic landmark is part of the Ararat Home of Los Angeles. His vision was to create an Armenian museum telling the Armenian story through artifacts, art, maps, books, coins, and other heirlooms. He began with his own private collection, opening the door for others to donate as well. Mr. Eskijian raised the funds for the construction of the church and the Museum, supervised the project even into his late 70’s, and was involved in much of the growth of the Museum for many years.

Libraries and Archival Rooms

AEM prides itself on its vast collection of over 6,000 primary and secondary sources including books, journals, periodicals, magazines and films dealing with subjects related to Armenian studies. The library is composed of collections from Professor Vahakn N. Dadrian, Professor Robert Hewsen, Mr. Luther Eskijian as well as other contributors. 
AEM prides itself on its vast collection of over 6,000 primary and secondary sources including books, journals, periodicals, magazines and films dealing with subjects related to Armenian studies within its three libraries. The Onnik Kouyoumjian Research Library, the Vahakn N. Dadrian Research Library and the Harold Mgrublian Library are available to visitors during regular hours. 

AEMs two archival rooms house digitized documents, photos, articles, newspapers and other sources from the collections of Dr. Vahakn N. Dadrian, Professor Robert Hewsen, Richard Demirjian (Armenian-American military collection) and Rev. Hovhanness Eskijian(Armenian humanitarian efforts 1915-1916).  These archival rooms are available to academic researchers and other interested parties by appointment.

The Sheen Memorial Chapel

The Sheen Memorial Chapel was the second part of Mr. Eskijian’s vision. As the designer and architect of this edifice, his desire was to reproduce an exterior structure resembling ancient Armenian churches as closely as possible.

The chapel was completed in 1994. It was endowed by Mr. John H. Sheen (Geovkalayjian), in memory of his father and brother who perished in the 1915 Armenian Genocide. Mr. Sheen, was also a survivor of the genocide, who was under the care of Baltic-German missionary Anna Hedvig Büll, from Estonia.

Click here to learn more about the Sheen Memorial Chapel.

Aurora Mardiganian Memorial Garden

Just outside of the museum doors is the memorial garden of Armenian survivor and international icon, Aurora Mardiganian. This memorial garden was established by the
Ararat Home of Los Angeles in her memory in 2018. 

Aurora Mardiganian was born Arshalouys Mardiganian in Chmshkatsag, an Armenian populated town near Kharpert in the Ottoman empire. Aurora Mardiganian became known to tens of thousands of people around the world through her story of survival and escape from deportation, massacre, and slavery during the Armenian Genocide of 1915.

Click here to learn more about Aurora’s journey to survival and her life in the
United States. 

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Ararat-Eskijian Museum
Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday, 11 am - 5 pm
15105 Mission Hills Road, Mission Hills, CA 91345